top of page
Umami Bioworks announces new partnership to launch ‘world’s first’ cultured fish cat treats
Business

Umami Bioworks announces new partnership to launch ‘world’s first’ cultured fish cat treats

Fooditive teams up with Leprino Foods to commercialise its animal-free casein
Dairy

Fooditive teams up with Leprino Foods to commercialise its animal-free casein

Cult Food Science publishes open letter to Florida govt opposing cultured meat ban
Business

Cult Food Science publishes open letter to Florida govt opposing cultured meat ban

Upside Foods to reduce workforce amid economic uncertainty
Meat

Upside Foods to reduce workforce amid economic uncertainty

Related posts

Researchers from Tufts University in Boston, US, have demonstrated the efficacy of edible mycelium as a scaffold for cells requiring attachment to grow.


The study, published in NPJ Science of Food journal, explores the use of edible mycelium to support the proliferation and differentiation of C2C12 cells, a line of mouse myoblasts commonly used as a model for muscle development.


The study reveals that mycelium-based scaffolds facilitate cell growth while also promoting better cell attachment and distribution compared to traditional non-edible carriers like Cytodex.


By testing a variety of mycelium strains, the researchers found that cultivated mammalian cells adhered best to A. oryzae, and the species also supported cell differentiation and proliferation.


The researchers experimented with both food grade and non-food grade fungi. The best performing strain, A. oryzae, is Generally Recognized as Safe and commonly used in food production – therefore, it would require no additional regulatory steps to be used as an edible scaffolding in the US, making it an attractive option for companies aiming to go to commercialise.


The results led the scientists to determine that it might be possible to create a mycelium microcarrier and also grow cells on the microcarrier in the same bioreactor, reducing manufacturing time, contamination risk and the cost of equipment.


Key findings:


Enhanced cell proliferation – the study demonstrated that C2C12 cells showed significant proliferation on mycelium carriers, especially at optimal seeding densities. This was measured by the reduction of alamarBlue, an indicator of metabolic activity, showing higher cell viability and growth rates compared to controls.


Lead researcher Marie DeRosa said: “The mycelium scaffolds outperformed traditional microcarriers, leading to a more efficient proliferation of muscle cells”.


Optimal seeding densities – researchers found that different seeding densities impacted the proliferation rates, with 5 × 10^4 to 5 × 10^5 cells/ml being the most effective for promoting cell growth without causing excessive aggregation, which can hinder uniform tissue development.


DeRosa added: "Optimising seeding densities is key to ensuring consistent and high-quality meat production”.


Sustainability and edibility – unlike traditional microcarriers, mycelium is not only biodegradable but also edible, aligning with sustainability goals and reducing waste in the production process. This positions mycelium as an eco-friendly alternative that supports the industry's move towards more sustainable practices.


These advantages make mycelium a more sustainable and efficient alternative for cell-based meat production. David Kaplan, senior author of the study, said: "Using mycelium as a scaffold provides a sustainable and edible alternative that enhances cell growth and tissue formation, crucial for the future of cultivated meat”.


The researchers stated that, in the future, they plan to look more specifically into the available surface area for cell attachment and possibly optimise that surface area, by changing oxygen levels, pH and feedstock used in the creation of the mycelium, to better serve cell growth and differentiation and maximise cell density.


"Our findings underscore the potential of mycelium to revolutionise the cultivated meat industry by providing a greener and more efficient production method," Kaplan concluded.


Top image: Ivy Farm's cultured pork sausage

#TuftsUniversity #US

Research: Tufts University develops edible mycelium for cell-based meat production

Phoebe Fraser

20 June 2024

Research: Tufts University develops edible mycelium for cell-based meat production

bottom of page