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British cell-based meat company Ivy Farm has collaborated with UK department store Fortnum & Mason to recreate the scotch egg using cultured beef mince.

The one-off collaboration saw a "handful” of cell-based meat scotch eggs created exclusively for the panel discussion on the future of meat production to highlight the environmental implications of industrial farming.

The scotch eggs were sampled by pre-selected attendees prior to the discussion. The panel was made up of speakers from both food-tech companies and traditional agricultural businesses.


Ivy Farm and Fortnum & Mason's cell-based beef scotch egg

The cell-based beef scotch eggs were created for the purpose of the event with the companies stating that they have “no plans to sell in the future”.

The process of creating the beef mince for the scotch eggs involves taking a cell sample from a farm-raised animal and cultivating the cells in fermentation tanks at Ivy Farm’s facility in Oxford, UK. Through this process, Ivy Farm says it produces 92% less emissions, 90% less land and 66% less water than conventional beef farming.

The event is part of an ongoing series of conversations led by Fortnum & Mason around the future of food innovation that bring together voices across technology, agriculture and hospitality.



The scotch egg is a traditional British dish that was first created by Fortnum & Mason in 1738 as a meal for travellers heading through London. It consists of a shelled hard-boiled egg that is wrapped in sausage, covered in breadcrumbs and then deep-fried or baked until crispy.

Fortnum & Mason says it has adapted the product in response to financial and logistical challenges, such as meat shortages during World War Two and innovated it to meet changing consumer tastes. By experimenting with cell-based meat, Fortnum & Mason is innovating again and exploring ways it could look to reduce the environmental impact of its products in the future.

Fortnum & Mason’s Food & Drink Studio producer, Hatty Cary, said: “We are thrilled to have had the opportunity to work with Ivy Farm to create the world’s first cultivated meat scotch egg, having launched our original almost 300 years ago. Fortnum's has always embraced innovation, but our recently opened Food & Drink Studio allows us to truly place ourselves at the heart of conversation and discovery.”

She continued: “It has been fascinating to examine what the future of meat production might look like by bringing together voices from the world of technology, agriculture and hospitality, and experimenting with such cutting-edge science.”

Emma Lewis, chief commercial and product officer at Ivy Farm, added: “Fortnum & Mason is an iconic heritage brand in the UK, so to recreate the scotch egg, an equally as iconic British snack, with our cultivated meat is an exciting opportunity to showcase how we can keep eating the nutritious and delicious meat that we love, but made in a different way”.

“Once we have scaled up, collaborations and partnerships like this will be pivotal as we look to introduce consumers to cultivated meat products on a wider scale, building acceptance in their quality and taste, and an understanding of the environmental benefits they can provide.”


#IvyFarm #UK

Fortnum & Mason and Ivy Farm team up on scotch egg made with cell-based beef

Phoebe Fraser

7 February 2024

Fortnum & Mason and Ivy Farm team up on scotch egg made with cell-based beef

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